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and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he had two brothers who died of tuberculosis so there wasn't very good health care. one brother was 7-years-old, six or seven and then his older brother died when he was 25 and so she was -- so he was very much an internationalist and nixon was a big supporter of the marshall plan and voted for it and a lot of his sestak e
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
been boors, the director of foreign policy at the brookings. the president going around the government and right to the young people of israel. >> it was an amazing speech he game yesterday in jerusalem, in which he spoke to 2,000 young israelis about the importance of israel to the united states, and made a very clear statement that israel would never be -- he explained his commitment to israeli security but went on to make an impassioned play for peacemaking and around the leadership in israel to say to the young people, it's time for you to push your leadership to take risks. >> this is a man with a 10% approval rating, which i'm guessing just went up. but at the same time, these israelis are dealing with harsh realities of walls on every border, an impossible long-term situation, and a realizeways that without peace, long term, not good. >> that's exactly the argument. then he went on to do something today which was somewhat of a breakthrough in terms of relations between turkey and israel. he managed to broker an apology from prime minister benjamin netanyahu to the prime minister
use and throw away the key. i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy. there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly fit in the left/right paradigm that i think would help because we are not the doing well in a lot of the purple and blue states so we do need a candidate that would appeal across the left/right paradigm. >> chris: we have about 30 seconds left. your budget which would balance the budget your plan would balance the budget in five years. paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years. you introduced it three consecutive years if and the most votes was this weekend when you got 18. isn't that out o of the mainstream? >> the thing is i think the legislature is ten years pee the public.behind i introduced a bill to quit sending money to egypt. 9 o percent of americans agree with me and 80% of the senators disagree with me. i would argue that the senate is not up-to-date on what the people really want chris thank you for joining us and always good to talk with you, sir. >> thank you. >> chris: up next, the supreme court
away the key. so, i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy and there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly left in the left-right paradigm that i think would help, because we're not doing very well in a lot of these states, purple and blue states and we need a candidate that would appeal across the left-right paradigm. >> chris: briefly, 30 seconds left, though. your budget which would balance the budget, your plan, would balance the budget in five years, paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years, you have introduced it three consecutive years in the senate, the most votes you got was this weekend when you got 18 of 100 senators, isn't it out of the mainstream? >> well, the thing is, i think the legislature is about ten years behind the public. for example, i have introduced amendments to quit sending money to egypt and build bridges here in the the united states instead of in egypt. and i bet you 90% of the american people agree with me but 80% of my senators disagree. i argue the senate is not up-to-date with
it all up, it's probably $2 trillion to $3 trillion of american costs, distorted american foreign policy. the idea that we took so much of our situation after the end of the cold war and we devoted it to iraq given everything else we could've, should've done. historians will scratch their head and say why did the united states get so distracted and distorted -- >> and stayed there after we knew there weren't weapons. >> and that's the big lesson we should draw from this in afghanistan. we've got to respect local realities. united states cannot go around the middle east and remake it in our liking. we've got to have a degree of humility about the limits of our influence. and you asked whether we learned the lessons. with vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, i hope we've learnlearn ed. >> and iraq and afghanistan. first of all, be far, far more skeptical than most of us were going in to iraq. also, no matter how far you are down the path, if it's the wrong path, turn around. and we should've done that. i want to read what you talked about the human cost. mike barnicle e-mailed me this last night
magazine, he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls and e-mails and tweets. each morning at seven eastern on c-span. >> 70,000 people have died since the protest of bashar al-assad and syria. there was a hearing on thursday. live coverage starts at 9:45 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> 34 years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks were created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you you as a public service by your television provider. >> edward demarco, the director of the federal housing finance agency testified on tuesday on the state of the housing market. and the future of fannie mae and freddie mac. this is two hours and 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee will come to order it without objection. the chair has authorized recess of the committee. at any time, the chair recognizes himself for two minutes for an opening statement. i would like to start off quoting from our witnesses testimony. few of us can imagine i
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
foreign policy? how are we doing muddling through this remarkable period of uncertainty? >> you know, i think we're muddling through is the best way i can put it. certain steps i think that have been positive, many that have been negative. i think the president when we saw the demonstrations in 2011 what the president did in calling for the end of hosni mubarak to step down this is a recognition this is a big deal and we need to get on the side of the populations understanding the public will be more empowered. other governments dictatorship, regimes in the gulf, close allies let's admit nondemocratic allies saw that and were frightened and they bring this up when they talk to their american partners. >> the saudis were on the phone. >> we saw you do that to mubarak. are we next? there are consequences to doing that. it's a error and we're feeling our way around. nine fairness we didn't immediately step in. we didn't see people revolting and automatically take the side of the people. we waited on that. we are late across the region. we're supportive of a syrian revolution and clamping
is the foreign policy if not the military role of your brand in china in areas like socom. have you noticed that unity, not military, diplomatic, economic activity that both these countries quick >> the short answer is absolutely. to put a little meat on a bone, one of the things i'm supposed to be doing is making sure the united states rants apart archers of latin america. the partnership is a too late thing i you'd agree that it's very one-way now and they very much want the united states in their lives the exception of the two or three or four of them very much want the united states and allies. so we have great trading relationships, great military to military contact, but when you have an organization like the chinese come in the economically powerful, spending money, whether they're increasing infrastructure that pours, panama canal are buying everything that they want and large, large quantities. the partnership with china is very strong. they do the best they can to establish milk to build partnerships and they do pretty well on that. so that's china. on the arabian side, we've seen
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
for so many years now. what are the prospects of that taking place. we know former foreign minister, with so much difficulty as policy minister, she will be at this dinner saturday night with netanyahu, john kerry and others trying to restart the peace talks. >> i would say to john kerry, good luck with that. if the americans really push for a renewed peace talks between the israelis and palestinians, i believe it will happen. neither side want to be the side that says no. will it be a real peace process with prospects of serious progress? i don't think so. and most analysts don't think so. because neither side is rooting for it. i always believe that time they are progress towards peace between the two sides is when each side realizes the limit of its own power. when israel realizes its weaponry will not sub jucate the palestinians forever and time is not on their side forever. until each side realizes that, i don't think there will be any real progress. there is no real demand for progress. it is also important to say that if there was a peace agreement on the table, i'm sure, and
at eastern on c-span and c-span3, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, the house foreign committee affairs allied u.s. policy toward the asia pacific region and of relations with china. he talks about north korea's's nuclear program, trade agreements, and india's role in the region. from the heritage foundation, this is about one hour. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. days, thext 13 president of the heritage foundation. i am delighted to have with us as amorning my successor new president, senator jim demint. we're happy you are here to join us. to theme all of you auditorium. it's good to see so many friends here and particularly a happy occasion for us to be able to co-host the reception afterward with the ambassador of the the republic of korea. it's very special time for korea to celebrate the first anniversary of chorus and we celebrate and commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the korean war. today, we have a number of other significant guests who are here with us representing the samsung company from their new jersey headquarters, mr. m.j. han and welcome you here on
his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. given that the general mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. that towards investment would put into iraq -- the and this meant we put into iraq shifted attention from asia? said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decads. ites. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. all regime was brutal \all the time. world one the whole a table. expenditures on iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physically. and it has not contributed to great regional stability but has an
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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